21 Jul 2016

What Will Stand in ACME International Journal of Critical Geographies

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A new publication, including scores and sound files, is included in the latest issue of ACME International Journal of Critical Geographies. You can access it here at ACME or here at academia.edu.

Magrane, E., W. Burk, and E. Quin-Easter. 2016. What will stand: Songs from (F)light, a collaborative borderlands song cycle. ACME: An International Journal for Critical Geographies 15 (2): 482-510.

(F)light: a borderlands song cycle is a creative response to migration. We wrote and composed the cycle of nine songs in relation to two particular borders: those between Arizona, United States and Sonora, Mexico; and Maine, United States and New Brunswick, Canada. The songs address borders, geopolitics, mobility, emotion, and narrative. We briefly contextualize our collaboration on (F)light and then share three songs from the project, as scores and as sound files performed by Women in Harmony, a women’s chorus in Portland, Maine.

(The sound files can be accessed either by clicking on the icons on the top of the scores if viewing the pdf in Adobe, or through clicking on the supplementary files on the right side of the ACME console.)

29 May 2016

Bycatch poems and drawings in Zócalo and Coordinates Society Magazine

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Early poems and drawings from Bycatch appear in April’s Zócalo and at the new online Coordinates Society Magazine.

Shame-faced crab in Zócalo

Shame-faced crab in Zócalo

Bycatch is a co-produced art-science project that combines geohumanities, political ecology, poetics, art, and marine ecology to creatively respond to the shrimp trawling industry in the Gulf of California. “Bycatch” refers to everything captured that is not the target species, so in this case, everything that is not shrimp. Approximately 87% of the weight of catch by shrimp trawlers is made up of 225+ species of bycatch fish, invertebrates, and turtles. The majority of shrimp caught in the industry is sold in the U.S.

I am collaborating with marine biologist and illustrator Maria Johnson on this project as part of the Next-Gen 6&6 Art + Science initiative. The field work for this collaboration has included overnight trips aboard shrimp trawlers off of Bahía de Kino, Sonora.

See more on Bycatch on the project website.

3 Apr 2016

Essay Daily Interview & Two Reviews

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Some new press on The Sonoran Desert: A Literary Field Guide:

The Sonoran Desert: A Literary Field GuideThe Literary Field Guide: A Q&A with Eric Magrane and Chris Cokinos in Essay Daily

Also, see reviews in Fine Books & Collections and Story Circle Book Reviews.

Upcoming events are here.

 

 

 

5 Nov 2015

Portfolio from Tumamoc Hill In Journal of the Southwest

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The current issue of the Journal of the Southwest, a special issue of the Next Generation of Sonoran Desert Researchers, includes a portfolio of art and poetry from Tumamoc Hill.

Mirocha, P., Magrane, E., Terkanian, B., Milstead, M., Koopman, K., Coleman, D., Wakamatsu, M., Soria, M. (2015). The Tumamoc Hill Arts Initiative: A Portfolio of Site-based Art and Poetry Inspired by a History of Sonoran Desert Science. Journal of the Southwest, 57 (2-3), 265-303.

Download the PDF here.

30 Aug 2015

Situating Geopoetics

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My article “Situating Geopoetics” is in the Association of American Geographers’ new journal GeoHumanities. Download the pdf here.

Here’s the abstract:

The form of the ars poetica is one in which the poet makes a statement on the art of poetry. Consider this a kind of ars-geo-poetica, a groundsetting for and statement on geopoetics that intends to both situate and to break open the field. This is an invitation for geopoetic texts and practices that draw on the work of poets as well as geographers, for an enchanted, earthy, and transaesthetic approach that moves to juxtapose contemporary poetics, particularly in the realm of ecopoetics, with critical human geography. Looking to geographers, poets, literary scholars, and poems themselves, this article aims to help situate and historicize geopoetics, provide a brief inventory of the current field, and carve out sites for future work.

Key Words: creative geographies, ecopoetics, geohumanities, geopoetics, site-based poetics.